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Grants (2) Available for the Preservation of Historical Documents

By Donna DiMichele | February 9, 2018

RI Supreme Court Historical Society Fund

The Rhode Island Foundation is now accepting applications for the RI Supreme Court Historical Society Fund.
The Rhode Island Supreme Court Historical Society Fund supports nonprofit organizations that wish to do the following:

Organizations should provide matching resources in funds or through in-kind services. Funds may not be used for the purchase of equipment.

The deadline to apply is March 09, 2018. Please click here to apply for the Rhode Island Supreme Court Historical Society Fund. If applicable, you may apply for funding from both funds.

Applicants are also encouraged to look at the Joseph O’Neill Ott Fund (see below) to see if their project meets that fund’s similar requirements.

Questions? Contact Kelly Riley, Donor Services Administrator 401-427-4028

Joseph O’Neill Ott Fund

The Rhode Island Foundation is now accepting applications for the Joseph O’Neill Ott Fund.

The Joseph O’Neill Ott Fund supports the preservation of historical manuscripts, documents and municipal records dating from the 19th century and earlier from the smaller cities and towns in Rhode Island.

Grants generally range from $250-$750 and support direct conservation efforts for paper-based documents, photographs, and other two-dimensional historical evidence (excluding artwork). This can include restoration, preservation, or to defray the costs associated with the acquisition of documents. Proposals that demonstrate concern about long-term storage issues or have planned document storage will be looked upon most favorably.

All historical and preservation societies from the smaller cities and towns of Rhode Island are eligible to apply.

The deadline to apply is March 09, 2018. Please click here to apply for the Joseph O’Neill Ott Fund.

Applicants are also encouraged to look at the Rhode Island Supreme Court Historical Society Fund (see above) to see if their project meets that fund’s similar requirements.

Questions? Contact Kelly Riley, Donor Services Administrator 401-427-4028

There are many other grant opportunities available on the RIF website www.rifoundation.org.

Topics: Grants, Preservation | No Comments »

Disability on the Shelf

By Donna DiMichele | February 6, 2018

Disability on the Shelf: Looking for Representation in Library Collections

Presented by Tegan Mannino, Circulation Supervisor and Cataloger at the Monson (MA) Free Library

Date: Monday, February 12, 2018

Time: 2:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: Online, Webinar

Hosted by the Massachusetts Library System but open to non-members.

Register now!

When asked, we all can think of a book, movie, or TV show that features a disabled character, but we don’t often think about the representation itself. With diversity and representation increasingly a part of our Collection Development practices, it is important we don’t continue to overlook this aspect. In this webinar, we invite participants to learn about disability, to gain an awareness of representation, and learn vocabulary and resources to evaluate materials.

Learning Outcomes:

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RARI 2018 Kick-Off for The Hate U Give

By Nicolette Baffoni | February 2, 2018

On Saturday, January 27 at The Pavilion at Grace in Providence, the RI Center for the Book hosted the kick-off event for 2018’s Reading Across Rhode Island (RARI) selection The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas.

The program opened with performances by AS220Youth and Living Literature. AS220Youth works with at-risk and-beyond risk young people age 14 -21, providing mentoring and educational activities while encouraging creative and artistic expression. Living Literature is a live Readers’ Theater group that has been working with RARI for several years to adapt the book selections and perform around the state at libraries and schools.

as220

AS220 Youth performed original raps and poetry

livinglit

Living Literature shared a scene from book

Two speakers followed, introducing the themes of The Hate U Give.  RARI Honorary Chair Jordan Seaberry, Director of Public Policy and Advocacy at the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence spoke about the legacies of racism and oppression following from slavery to mass incarceration and police brutality.  Keynote speaker Shawn A. Christian, Associate Provost, Associate Professor of English, African American, & American Studies, Wheaton College focused more specifically on the novel, discussing the importance of listening to and amplifying the voices of young black women.

RARI 2018 Honorary Chair Jordan Seaberry

shawnchristian

Keynote Speaker Shawn A. Christian

Holly Harriel of Civic Salon LLC closed the program by discussing the “digital archive” of RARI 2018 that Civic Salon will create through Twitter chats, unified social media tags, and online resources.  The first RARI #CivicChat will take place on Twitter on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 from 8-9 pm.  You can use the handy image of hashtags and @’s for Twitter, Instagram and Facebook to follow and amplify RARI2018.

The Hate U Give Resource Guide compiled by the RARI committee is available for download, while additional resources for the book can be found at Civic Salon’s Civic Lab.

Angie Thomas will visit RI on April 12th and 13th; her schedule will be released soon so keep an eye out for that! For more information about borrowing sets of books for your classroom, library or book group, or to help purchase additional copies of the book to meet the high community demand, contact Kate Lentz (kate@ribook.org).

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The Rhode Island Foundation Offers Training

By Donna DiMichele | January 16, 2018

The Rhode Island Foundation, Initiative for Nonprofit Excellence (INE) is offering a full slate of programs in the coming months for nonprofit staff, volunteers, and board members. Programs range from grant writing to board service and from fund development to board peer learning meetings. Programs include:

The INE provides opportunities for nonprofits to strengthen organizational capacity through topic-focused workshops. INE workshops enable staff, board members, and volunteers representing Rhode Island nonprofit organizations to learn skills and techniques that will enable them to better achieve their mission.

A comprehensive list of the programs, and their intended audiences, is online.

Topics: Continuing Education, News & Information, Resources | Comments Off on The Rhode Island Foundation Offers Training

Owning Our Story: about the overdose epidemic

By Donna DiMichele | January 5, 2018

[Owning Our Story]

Come Be a Part of a Powerful Evening to Rewrite the End to Rhode Island’s Overdose Epidemic

Owning Our Story: About the Overdose Epidemic

The Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) and Creating Outreach About Addiction Support Together (COAAST) will be hosting a FREE, community event called Owning Our Story: About the Opioid Overdose Epidemic on Monday, January 15 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Providence . This special event will feature TED-style Talks, testimonials, and an adaptation of COAAST’s “Four Legs to Stand On.”

COAAST is a Rhode Island-based organization that is working to end the opioid overdose epidemic through arts-based educational performances and events. The organization specializes in drama therapy, which is the use of drama and theatre processes to achieve therapeutic goals. More information is available at coaast.org.

Speakers include:

Libraries are hubs of community engagement and sources of trusted information. Please share information about this event with your community.

View the Owning Our Story Facebook event at bit.ly/OOS-RI, or call 401-598-6061 for more information.

The event is open to the public.  Appropriate for ages 13+

Libraries are hubs of community engagement and sources of trusted information. Please share information about this event with your community.

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Prepare Your Library for Winter Weather

By Donna DiMichele | January 2, 2018

Prepare Your Library for Extreme Cold and Severe Winter Weather

Library facilities are subject to the same risks as homes during prolonged periods of extreme cold, especially if the library building will be closed for more than 24 hours. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) gives specific recommendations to prepare yourself and your home. Many of these recommendations will apply to library facilities. Visit Ready.gov page on Snowstorms and Extreme Cold  for a comprehensive list of action steps.

The following are some highlights tailored for library facilities.

Review the Staff Communications Plan

Precautions for Your Facility

During Snowstorms and Extreme Cold

Cold Related Illness: Hypothermia, Frostbite

Frostbite is a serious condition that’s caused by exposure to extremely cold temperatures. If you observe any of the following in staff or patrons, seek medical care for them. Elderly and homeless people are especially susceptible.

Hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature, is a dangerous condition that can occur when a person is exposed to extremely cold temperatures.  Hypothermia is caused by prolonged exposures to very cold temperatures. When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it’s produced. Lengthy exposures will eventually use up your body’s stored energy, which leads to lower body temperature. Warnings signs of hypothermia include:

Carbon Monoxide

Caution: Each year, an average of 430 Americans die from unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning, and there are more than 20,000 visits to the emergency room with more than 4,000 hospitalizations. Carbon monoxide-related deaths are highest during colder months. These deaths are likely due to increased use of gas-powered furnaces and alternative heating, and power sources used inappropriately indoors during power outages. Read more about carbon monoxide poisoning on Medline Plus.

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RARI Kick-Off January 27

By Donna DiMichele | January 2, 2018

The Hate U Give

Reading Across Rhode Island (RARI), Rhode Island’s One Book, One State community read program kicks off its 16th year on January 27th. The 2018 RARI selection is The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas.

The Office of Library and Information is a proud to sponsor Reading Across Rhode Island.

Speakers and Performers will offer engaging introductions to the book’s themes:

This is a ticketed event $15.00 Register and purchase tickets.  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2018-reading-across-rhode-island-kick-off-tickets-41285686600

The Hate U Give is a brave, thought-provoking, conversation-enabling novel about what prejudice looks like in the 21st century. Sixteen-year-old Starr lives in two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she was born and raised and her private high school in the suburbs. The uneasy balance between them is shattered when Starr is the only witness to the fatal shooting of her unarmed best friend.

Author Angie Thomas was born, raised, and still resides in Jackson, Mississippi. She is a former teen rapper whose greatest accomplishment was having an article about her in Right On! Magazine. She holds a BFA in creative writing and can still rap if needed. The Hate U Give is her first novel.

Questions? Contact Kate Lentz at kate@ribook.org. Further reading lists, book discussion guides, the author’s website, audio interviews and other supplementary materials may be found on the Center for the Book website.

Topics: Events, Literacy | Comments Off on RARI Kick-Off January 27

Senator Reed introduces IMLS reauthorization bill

By admin | December 22, 2017

On December 21, Rhode Island’s own Senator Jack Reed and a bipartisan group of senators introduced the bill to reauthorize the Museum and Library Services Act.  The bill renews and builds on the $231 million committed to museum and library programs administered by the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Support for libraries is a long standing tradition for Rhode Island senators: in 1996, Senator Claiborne Pell was instrumental in crafting the first Museum and Library Services Act.

In 2017, the Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services (OLIS) received $1,070,238 from IMLS under the Library and Services and Technology Act Grants to States Program.  In the past 10 years, OLIS has received over $10 million dollars in federal funding to support library services and programs in Rhode Island.

Thank you Senator Reed, and your colleagues in Maine (Senator Susan Collins), Mississippi (Senator Thad Cochran), New York (Senator Kirsten Gillibrand) and Alaska (Senator Lisa Murkowski).

Topics: IMLS, News & Information | Comments Off on Senator Reed introduces IMLS reauthorization bill

Library Freedom Institute

By Donna DiMichele | December 19, 2017

The Library Freedom Institute (LFI) is a privacy-focused training for librarians to teach them the skills necessary to thrive as Privacy Advocates: from installing privacy software to influencing public policy.  The Program is offered by the Library Freedom Project (LFP).

Building on the success of the LFP’s shorter courses, participants will learn how to:

Library Freedom Institute is a six-month program for a select group of librarians made possible by generous support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Participants will spend 5 hours per week on a combination of readings, webinars, exercises, class discussion, and assignments. LFI is a free online course with one in-person requirement, which will take place on a weekend in New York City.

To be eligible to participate, applicants must complete an application and supply permission from a supervisor. There is no cost to this program; including the weekend in NYC. LFI is primarily seeking public librarians, but welcomes applications from all librarians who do outreach in their communities.

Learn more about the program and the application process online.

Topics: 21st Century Skills in Libraries, Digital Literacy, IMLS, News & Information, Technology | Comments Off on Library Freedom Institute

Public libraries: apply for Revisiting the Founding Era funding

By Donna DiMichele | December 15, 2017

Public libraries are invited to apply for Revisiting the Founding Era, a nationwide project that will use historical documents to spark public conversations about the Founding Era’s enduring ideas and themes and how they continue to influence our lives today.

Revisiting the Founding Era is a project of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in collaboration with the American Library Association (ALA) and the National Constitution Center. The project is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Up to 100 U.S. public libraries will be selected to host programs related to the American Revolution and the early years of the nation.
Participating libraries will receive:

Libraries, working in collaboration with scholars, local experts and others, will be asked to implement at least three public programs for adult and teen audiences. Topics may include the rights of citizens versus the rights of government; who is “we the people?”; and decision-making and taking action.

Read the full project guidelines and apply online by January 31, 2018. Public libraries serving rural or underserved communities are especially encouraged to apply.

Revisiting the Founding Era will be administered by ALA’s Public Programs Office.

About the American Library Association

About the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

About the National Constitution Center

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

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